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LIGHTNING RELEASES (1/9/2014) – Former FBI special agent Donald Wilson’s recently published book “Evidence Withheld” describes Wilson’s visit to the media, Penna. FBI office on March 8, 1971. This visit was within hours of the now infamous burglary, the results of which disclosed to the world a mountain of illegal activity engaged in by the FBI. At the time, Wilson, who was visiting his mother who lived in Morton, Penna., was a FBI special agent assigned to the Cincinnati field office.

Wilson was enroute to a required training session at the FBI academy in Quantico, VA. When he took several vacation days to spend time with his mother in Morton, Penna. Wilson’s book “evidence withheld” describes in one of the chapters his visit to and conversation with one of the agents assigned to the media FBI office regarding the lack of security systems in the small FBI office.

Wilson was given a tour of the office including the location of files containing FBI documents. After Wilson left the media office, unconfirmed rumors have Wilson making a phone call from a gas station in Morton, Penna., to Bill Davidon, who is alleged to have organized the burglary and advising Davidon that “everything is a go.” It is also rumored that Davidon vowed to Wilson that he would disclose to no one Wilson’s role in the break-in. There is also a rumor that Wilson’s only request was to be informed as to the identity of the FBI informant involved in the king assassination should that information be discovered.

Wilson’s book “Evidence Withheld” deals with his role in the king assassination investigation and the withholding of evidence implicating the FBI in king’s assassination. Wilson was the subject of an investigation in 2000 by the U.S. Department of justice who concluded that Wilson’s account should be discounted as not credible. The evidence, in the form of hand written notes recovered by Wilson from the car of convicted assassin James Earl Ray, however, could not be eliminated by the U.S. Secret service laboratory as being authentic.

Written by Donald Wilson